What is MRSA Infection? – 4 Key Facts


What is MRSA? MRSA is a drug resistant strain of the common staphylococcus aureus bacteria. Bacteria can live outside your body and can also live quietly on your skin until it finds a cut, wound or graze to infect. It is found on the  skin of 1-2% of people – but ordinary staphylococcus aureus is on the skin of up to 35% of people. Both MRSA and Staph can cause infections on your skin or in wounds but MRSA is harder to treat as it is resistant to several antibiotics. MRSA is often caught in hospitals but is becoming common in the community. Discover what you need to know about infection, symptoms, treatment and prevention here.

What is MRSA.

First – an explanation of the MRSA initials. Methicillin – this was one of the first drugs used against staphylococcus aureus infections. MRSA is now resistant to many other penicillin and cephalosporin drugs but this one gave it its name. Resistant – while many drugs kill the bacteria they are aimed at others don’t or people stop before the drug has completed the task. This allows the bacteria to begin to resist that drug when it encounters it again. Staphylococcus aureus – this is a common type of bacteria that looks like a bunch of grapes under the microscope. The name has greek origins

How do you catch MRSA?

You can catch MRSA in the home, in hospitals or in public environments with high touch surfaces used by many people. It is often accidentally left behind by an MRSA carrier on hard surfaces where it can survive for weeks. High contact sport, shared gym equipment, sex and shared household items can also be part of the MRSA transmission chain. What is MRSA – How do you catch it

What are the symptoms of MRSA?

For many people their experience of MRSA will be linked to a skin condition. But MRSA can also find it’s way into the bloodstream and cause infections. These can only be diagnosed via blood tests and other medical technology. What is MRSA – The symptoms

Other pages about MRSA symptoms

How is MRSA Infection treated?

There are 4 different types of treatment – these range from incision and drainage of a wound to specific drug treatment for the strain of MRSA you may have. What is MRSA – Treatment

How can I protect myself against MRSA?

Read our guide to protecting yourself. Find out about hand washing, surface hygiene and ways of protecting your household when one of you has MRSA. What is MRSA – Precautions


MRSA BASICS
MRSA Symptoms – what are they?
What is MRSA?
How does MRSA spread in the family?
A simple
MRSA treatment guide
Exposure to MRSA – Should I be worried?
How do you catch MRSA?

7 thoughts on “What is MRSA Infection? – 4 Key Facts

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  6. latisha Burrece

    so i want to know if somebody gets mersa if you would end up killing somebody because of it. I know its a stupid question but thats what i was told. Because i saposively had mersa when i was 13 and i didnt tell my boyfriend now that i evadently had or have it.

    Reply
    1. admin Post author

      1 in 3 people have the staph bacteria on their skin at any one time. 4 out of 5 carry it on their skin at some point in their lives. Staph is like the cousin of MRSA and can be just as lethal but is easier to treat. This bacteria is everywhere. There are things you can do to get rid of it and it’s worth trying – but being a carrier does not make you ill or anyone else ill. It just puts you at a higher risk if you have cuts or wounds that the bacteria can enter.

      Dave
      mrsainfection.net

      Reply

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