MRSA skin infections – 3 key sources

MRSA Skin infections often spread via skin contact. Here are some of the key ways:

MRSA skin infection – via a hand

Your hand can pick up minute quantities of bacteria from everyday contaminated surfaces These include high touch areas such as bathrooms, public transport, light switches and door handles. This in turn can help the transfer to other parts of your skin or to your nose. It will not cause an active infection straightaway in most cases but is ready to infect any cut, graze or skin disturbance you may suffer.

Via sexual contact

The intimacies of sex and the high skin contact involved may mean that an MRSA carrier can pass on MRSA bacteria to their partner. This will often ‘hide’ near the groin, under the arms and in the nose. Regular hand washing, and showering after sexual activity if you are living with an MRSA carrier will help keep the infection at bay and perhaps ensure you are only a temporary carrier.

MRSA skin infection – via sporting activity

For those who are carriers the danger with sport relates to small injuries that can become infected. There is also a danger for non carriers in that sporting surfaces may carry MRSA bacteria on the area of play. This is particularly true of football on artificial pitches and wrestling generally. Becoming a carrier and having an infected wound could happen during a contest.

You should bear in mind that 35-50% of people carry the staph aureus (SA) part of MRSA anyway. It can be very destructive as well. It will be hard to avoid the reality that this infection and several others are often close at hand. Good personal hygiene and general good health will mean that most people do not suffer any major infection because of their brush with these bacteria.

MRSA is not a death sentence. Most people who die with it are very ill anyway with other conditions, hence their weakened defenses. For the rest of us proper treatment will usually banish it.

MRSA Symptoms – what are they?
What is MRSA?
How does MRSA spread in the family?
A simple
MRSA treatment guide
Exposure to MRSA – Should I be worried?
How do you catch MRSA?

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